Vaccinations for a Puppy: The 2 Most Important Ones

If you're the proud parent of a new puppy, congratulations! Bringing home a new puppy is an exciting time. But along with the joys of puppyhood come some important responsibilities. One of your most important tasks will be to ensure that your puppy receives all their vaccinations on schedule. This post takes a look at two vaccines that are most important for puppies. Rabies Vaccine When most people think of rabies, they think of wild animals.   Read More...

When That Tail Doesn't Wag: Has Your Dog Sprained Their Tail?

A dog with a limp tail may be trying to say something. It can be a sign of fear and stress, but before you wonder who has dared to frighten or stress out your beloved pooch, have you considered that your dog may have sprained their tail? Discomfort for Your Dog When it comes to ease of treatment, a sprained tail isn't especially complicated to correct. But don't assume that it's an insignificant injury, as it can be very painful for your dog.   Read More...

How Neutering Will Improve Your Dog's Behaviour

Neutering your dog is about more than just preventing puppies. While eliminating the risk of any accidental matings is definitely one of the biggest benefits of neutering, there are many more advantages to the procedure. Alongside health benefits (such as a reduced likelihood of developing cancer or prostate complications), one of the most overlooked benefits of neutering your dog is how much it can improve their behaviour. Here are just four main changes you may notice after neutering your furry friend.   Read More...

Does Your Dog Have a Dental Cavity?

In theory, any creature with teeth can develop a cavity in those teeth. Perhaps humans are the most susceptible to cavities, due to the amount of sugar that can be found in the average diet. But if you or any member of your family develops a cavity, then it's off to your dentist. But it's not as though each and every member of your family can actually tell you if they're experiencing a problem with one of their teeth.   Read More...

Grooming a Dog with Cushing's Disease

Certain canine medical conditions can be treated with surgery, although surgery is not necessarily going to be recommended. This is the case with Cushing's disease, which also exists in humans. The disease means that your dog's body produces excessive cortisol, which is a steroid hormone. Most instances of Cushing's disease are triggered by a small growth on your dog's pituitary gland (located at the base of their brain). Given the location of the growth, surgery is risky, which is why your dog's condition will generally be managed with medication, along with certain dietary and lifestyle recommendations.   Read More...